MASTERING THE ART OF FRENCH COOKING EPUB

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The only cookbook that explains how to create authentic French dishes in American kitchens with American foods. I'm not sure how we all feel about 'free' cookbooks, but thought I'd share. Not only are the recipes themselves fantastic and thoroughly. Mastering the Art of French Cooking () VOLUME TWO. BY JULIA CHILD. The French Chef Cookbook () From Julia Child's Kitchen () Julia Child .


Mastering The Art Of French Cooking Epub

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Mastering the Art of French Cooking (). VOLUME ONE. BY JULIA CHILD. The French Chef Cookbook (). From Julia Child's Kitchen (). Julia Child . Download ebook MASTERING THE ART OF FRENCH COOKING. French cooking ebook, art of french cuisine, french art cooking. sirochaterfarm.tk - Ebook download as PDF File .pdf) or read book online.

But you can make them yourself with pride and pleasure and at a fraction of the cost. Until our editor, in her gentle but compelling way, suggested that we really owed it to our readers to include a recipe for French bread, we had no plans at all to tackle it. Two years and some pounds of flour later, we had tried out all the home-style recipes for French bread we could find, we had two professional French textbooks on baking, we had learned many things about yeasts and doughs, yet our best effort, which was a type of peasant sourdough loaf, still had little to do with real French bread.

Fortunately those two years on the wrong road had been useful, because as soon as Professor Calvel started in, we knew what he was talking about, even though every step in the bread-making process was entirely different from anything we had heard of, read of, or seen.

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His dough was soft and sticky; he let it rise slowly twice, to triple its original volume—the dough must ripen to develop its natural flavor and proper texture. Forming the dough into its long-loaf or round-loaf shapes was a fascinating process, and so logical; slashing the top of the risen loaves before sliding them into the oven was another special procedure. This was a tremendously exciting day for us, as you can imagine. We now knew we could succeed, because we had seen and felt with our own hands so clearly where we had failed.

There remained the problem of working out the formula with American all-purpose bleached flour instead of the softer French unbleached flour. Although you can produce a presentable loaf without these two professional oven requirements, you will not get quite the high rise or quite the crust.

Paul Child and his usual Yankee ingenuity solved the hot baking surface by lining the oven rack with red quarry tiles, which he heated up with the oven; he created a great burst of steam by placing a pan of water in the bottom of the oven, and dropping a red-hot brick into it.

We are thus delighted to report that you can make marvelous French bread in your own kitchen with ordinary American ingredients and equipment.

While packaged dough mixes and frozen adaptations can certainly serve in emergencies, it is part of your training as a cook that you be able to turn out at least the dough for a pastry shell as a matter of course. It is actually, we think, when you have made the dough for your first quiche or tart, and have been complimented enthusiastically and specifically on the crust, that you begin to feel you are stepping out of the kindergarten and into a more advanced class of cooking.

If you have had troubles or qualms, therefore, about handmade dough, try the recipe here ; the electric mixer or food processor works quickly and beautifully.

COLD FLAVORED BUTTERS

And if you have hesitated to tackle the traditional flan ring lined with dough and weighted down with foil and beans, try the upside-down cake-pan method , which is an easy way to make pastry shells. Furthermore, the egg formula in the recipe makes a deliciously crisp, tender, buttery crust.

Properly made, it is flakily tender, and a delight to both tongue and palate. We have spent years on puff pastry ourselves, wanting to make sure that the recipe in this book would be as good with American flour as it is with French flour—the trouble with American all-purpose flour being that it has a higher gluten content than French flour, and that makes differences all along the line.

We worked out combinations of unbleached pastry flour and all-purpose flour, we have tried instant-blending flour, and we have finally settled on a mixture of regular all-purpose flour and cake flour as being the most sensible. Although it takes a little longer to work with, it produces a beautifully tender, high-rising dough that is even more impressive, we think, than its French counterpart.

The illustrated recipe for simple puff pastry is easy to follow, and we suggest your first creation be a handsome puff pastry tart, the cheese , or the jam. Both of them are quick to form, yet give a very handsome effect to start you off in a whirl of success.

CHICKEN IN PIECES

Our forefathers did the kind of cooking in Chapter V , Charcuterie, if they lived on a farm and made their own sausages and cured their own pork.

The particularly wonderful taste of these creations is derived from the fact that they are freshly made, on the premises. We, who want to partake of the same pleasures, must make our own. And for anyone who enjoys cooking, producing charcuterie, like making bread and pastry, is a deeply satisfying occupation. You will be amazed, if you have never tried your own before, how rewarding just a homemade sausage patty can be; it is only freshly ground pork mixed with salt and spices, but it tastes the way one dreams sausage meat should taste.

The final chapter contains favorite desserts and cakes that we have been testing out on our guinea pigs—our students and families—for a number of years. We also give you a group of original fruit desserts, custards, and a liqueur-soaked French shortcake, a number of handsome desserts made with puff pastry, and a selection of petits fours.

Mastering the Art of French Cooking was published in and was an instant hit.

When Julia Child later appeared on the television series The French Chef she and the book became even more popular. Fifty years later it remains the classic work on French cooking. Rating details. Book ratings by Goodreads. Goodreads is the world's largest site for readers with over 50 million reviews. We're featuring millions of their reader ratings on our book pages to help you find your new favourite book.

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Sign up now. But rather than continuing on every front, we have selected seven subjects, and having so long ago rejected complete treatises, we have pursued each only in the directions that we felt were most useful or interesting.

We wanted to add to the repertoire of informal vegetable soups, for example, and these take up a large part of the first chapter. We felt the need for a fine lobster bisque; this gave rise to a study of lobster cutting, and in turn led us to crabs, which are not adequately explored in most recipes the whole matter of crab tomalley is almost never mentioned, yet it is every bit as precious as lobster tomalley.

Then, although we adore bouillabaisse which is in Volume I , there are other French fish stews that make marvelous one-dish meals, so we have added a marmite, a matelote, and a bourride. Thus the soup chapter is an enlargement in breadth.

Mastering the Art of French Cooking Volumes 1 & 2

Meat, poultry, and vegetables we have attacked in depth, following the same system of theme and variations used in Volume I, but taking it perhaps even further. Ordinary pieces of frying chicken are poached in white wine and aromatic vegetables, making a deliciously non-fattening dish that you can serve informally as is, with boiled rice and a green vegetable.

With egg yolks and cream the original chicken dish becomes a Belgian waterzooi, with garlic mayonnaise it is a chicken bourride, and with slightly different vegetable flavors but the same cooking methods it is a bouillabaisse of chicken. Thus, starting with one master technique, you are putting your cooking vocabulary to use the way it should be used, and if you are just beginning to cook, this is an exercise in recognition.

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You will recognize that sauce when you run into it again in some other guise. For the experienced, we hope these ideas will start you off on further ventures in other categories. Beef stews, veal chops and steaks, and veal stews take the same type of tour, our object being to show what you can do with reasonably priced meats for family meals as well as for entertaining.

On the other hand, the luxurious tenderloin of beef also has its series of transformations. It is roasted whole, baked in a cloak of mushrooms duxelles and wine, as well as being, in another recipe, cut into slices and stuffed before roasting. Finally, in an original version of Beef Wellington, it is sliced, stuffed, and baked in a special type of brioche crust. An expensive roast of veal undergoes a group of variations, as does a whole roasting chicken, which finally appears with a boned breast and a corseting of pastry.

We hope you will enjoy the vegetable chapter as much as we do, because we have had fun with these recipes.

Although there are a few of the classics, like pommes Anna and pommes duchesse, most of the recipes are originals that we have been working on for a number of years until we felt they were ripe for you and this volume. There are stuffed onions, stuffed cabbage, stuffed zucchini, and cold stuffed artichoke hearts. Again, most of the vegetable chapter is built on themes and variations, and is designed to engender the flow of your creative juices.

Two entirely new categories are the chapters on breads and pastry doughs and on charcuterie. These everyday staples in France were once considered luxury items here and, in fact, when you download them now in gourmet shops they are luxuries. But you can make them yourself with pride and pleasure and at a fraction of the cost. Until our editor, in her gentle but compelling way, suggested that we really owed it to our readers to include a recipe for French bread, we had no plans at all to tackle it.

Two years and some pounds of flour later, we had tried out all the home-style recipes for French bread we could find, we had two professional French textbooks on baking, we had learned many things about yeasts and doughs, yet our best effort, which was a type of peasant sourdough loaf, still had little to do with real French bread.

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Fortunately those two years on the wrong road had been useful, because as soon as Professor Calvel started in, we knew what he was talking about, even though every step in the bread-making process was entirely different from anything we had heard of, read of, or seen.

His dough was soft and sticky; he let it rise slowly twice, to triple its original volume—the dough must ripen to develop its natural flavor and proper texture. Forming the dough into its long-loaf or round-loaf shapes was a fascinating process, and so logical; slashing the top of the risen loaves before sliding them into the oven was another special procedure.

This was a tremendously exciting day for us, as you can imagine. We now knew we could succeed, because we had seen and felt with our own hands so clearly where we had failed.Place the bacon strips in a pan of cold water, about 1 quart for each 4 ounces.

We were fortunate indeed to rent the top floor of a fine old Louis XVI-style private house, and as soon as we settled ourselves I enrolled in the Berlitz school of languages for two hours every day.

These are made from peanuts, corn, cottonseed, sesame seed, poppy seed, or other analogous ingredients. All cleaning, alas, removes infinitesimal bits of the tin lining.

If it is allowed to thicken with a little buttermilk, it will taste quite a bit like French cream, can be boiled without curdling, and will keep for 10 days or more under refrigeration; use it on fruits or desserts, or in cooking. Of course, that was the happy era when emphasis was on the quality of the beef, not the fat content.

The station put us in the charge of Russell Morash, then a young producer of science programs, now the well-known master of This Old House, The Victory Garden , and other successful series. Cook the onions and leeks slowly in olive oil for 5 minutes or until almost tender but not browned.

We had announced to our friends that we were coming and asked them to provide us with opportunities. Cooking is not a particularly difficult art, and the more you cook and learn about cooking, the more sense it makes.

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Also read my other posts. I have always been a very creative person and find it relaxing to indulge in cheerleading. I do love reading novels knowledgeably.
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